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Mending Wall


Mike:
Can't say I'm surprised to hear of an exodus of young people from the Green Mountain State. I mean what kind of career can you have there?

 

Bill:
Well, there's your cow milkahs, your ski lift operatahs, or you know, you could always hang out in Burlington and get a job at an alternative bookstore selling 100% hemp "Che" t-shirts to hairy legged vegan chicks.

 

Mike:
Hey, how many Vermonters does it take to change a light bulb? … Three. One to change the bulb and two to sit around discussing how they liked the old one better.

 

Bill:
Heh. All kidding aside, Vermont is a great state and Vermonters are good folk. The true old school New England spirit is still alive and well up there.

 

Mike:
Yeah, something tells me guys like David Wells wouldn't be asking for trades because of "the worst evah seen" lack of privacy if our fellow Massholes had a bit more Vermonter in them.

 

Bill:
Absolutely. Remembah Red Sox fans what the great New Englandah Robert Frost admonished: Good fences make good neighbahs.

 

Mike:
Give the playahs some space and privacy. Keep the wall between us as we go.

 

Comments

There's got to be a few thousand jobs in Vermont tapping maple trees. Honorable work that is - making sure I have my grade A amber available on Sunday morning :)

I like the Wells news too. Can't have too many battle tested arms on the roster, evah.

Good job, Wellsie. Now, if we can make Foulkie comfortable at BK and Manny invisible at the Burlington Mall, then maybe we have something to talk about. Best comment from Wells was that he wants to go out with a winner. I think he must be smellin' some of what the Theo is cookin'

Loretta for MVP....

lc

Oops. Typo. Link is fixed now. Thanks!

Boy, talk about self-selecting your data. That NYT article starts out in Poultney, which is quite easily the poster child for ugly little hick town in the middle of nowhere with nothing going on. I got stuck up there for a college development lacrosse camp one year and aside from the gas station and a hillybilly tavern there's absolutely NOTHING to do there. With towns like that, no wonder the youts are leaving VT in droves.

But in all seriousness, when you all but openly declare your hostility towards business and new development, well, don't be surprised when most of the youngsters don't want to live in a rustic 150 year old colonial down a back road from state route 456 and plow snow for a living.

Hart,

Although I think the sentiment you're expressing is a good one (and certainly one that RSN should take to heart), you're misrepresenting Mr. Frost a bit - it's his stuffy and traditional neighbor who loves his fences. Frost would just as soon see them removed as being a rediculous and out-of-date waste of time.

Give me Sandburg's Chicago poems over Frost any day.

Yes, that's one way to interpret Mending Walls. Certainly the notion that the wall is symbol to represent all the antagonistic or mistrustful barriers that divide man from man is a popular one.

But I've always been swayed by how the speaker of the poem has great affection for the neighbor. And I've always taken it that their yearly get together to rebuild the wall nature has tumbled is something they booth look forward to.

I've always interpreted the poem as the speaker coming to the conclusiong that the old timer gets it right. The wall separates them yet joins them.

But, I'll admit my bias for that old school style "Yankee" (in the original sense of the word) who wants to keep a distance from people, so I very well may be projecting that when I interpret the poem as I do.

I'm 100% alligned with the poet Charles Bukowski when he wrote, "I don't hate people, I just feel a lot better when they're not around."

Or, as Mrs. LC says: "People like you until they get to know you".

I didn't know Ryne Sandberg did poetry...

Wow, h.b., I know the Oscars were boring and poor Jon Stewart was left hanging out to dry...but a strip about Vermont to start the week?

"... but a strip about Vermont to start the week"

Is that really what the strip is about today?

So, besides skiing and syrup, what jobs are available in Vermont?

When I was 21, between school breaks, I would head up to the family farm in Vermont. The place is beautiful, the cleanest rivers I had ever seen. But there was not a lot going on up there job wise, and I can understand why people would leave looking for work and new challenges. It would seem ambition seeks urban environments.

M

They should just turn the entire state of Vermont into a National Park and get it over with already.

We've got Manny and Wells coming around!

It must be spring!!

Next your gonna tell me that Mike Lowell has come forward on his past steroids abuse and his clean living lifestyle this year gives him a season HR total of 45, including the season series winner in the 9th over the Yankees!

Woohoo, Sox Baseball! Gotta Love It!

Don't forget the classic Vermont growth industry of Bed and Breakfasting.

HB makes a good point though: let the Sox be! If you see Boomer at Dunks, let him get his coffee without being asked for an autograph, pic, etc. If you see Manny at Hot Topic hitting on some 16-year old tang, then let him do his thing.

Boomer Wells, the Bard of Lard, writes: "Good french fries make good toothpicks."

Even the most misanthropic New Englanders could not construct a fence long or high enough to protect themselves from Boomer's moronic musings.

Bothersome Boston baseball fans "the worst invaders of his privacy evah?" Even worse than the greasy punk who sucker-punched his teeth out in a NY diner? Uh, yes, according to the loopy lefty. Go figure Boomer logic.

I guess I missed the underlying allegory in the Vermont discussion.

And I agree with Babe's post above. Yes, I really did just type that sentence!

Excellent strip today h.b., and as someone whose maternal-side of the family hails from the Green Mountain State (Woodstock, to be precise), I couldn't agree with Kaz more: whatever isn't already developed, make into a National Park a la Yellowstone. Lots of work for those who choose to stay, no suburban sprawl...it won't wind up looking like everywhere else.

Further, it is with more than a small amount of pride that Vermonters claim one Carlton Fisk as one of their own. God, just as the sap in the Maples, I can feel the baseball/spring fever rising. I cannot believe that I scored in the Green Monster lottery and I will be taking my dad for his 69th bday to 2nd row Green Monster seats vs. the O's in August! I need a time machine!

Carlton Fisk was born in Vermont because that is where the nearest hospital happened to be. He apparently fled the state for Charlestown, NH somewhere around the age of 5 days. Which makes it amusing that the state of Vermont claims him as one of their own and makes today's strip all the more amusing.

Being a born and bred Vermonter (and still a resident!) and reader of this great strip, I thought this to be a good first time to comment.

With regard to Wells: good news, I'd say so long as he can stay off the DL.

Vermont: Sure, of course kids are leaving and it's not soley because there aren't jobs here (actually, there are jobs). There surely aren't the opportunities that there are elsewhere but it is this coupled with the housing market. Wealthy flatlanders are pricing out the locals like you'd read about in Usurper Magazine. The young, with their fledgling, post-school salaries can't compete with the affluent, urban types except to live in a double-wide on a postage stamp lot. And who the hell wants to do that?

Congrats on the Monster Seats, Tito-ista, and happy birthday to your Dad. HB, I'm surprised the Soxaholix could dedicate so many panels to Vermont without mentioning its most famous RedSox-related resident, Bill "the Spaceman" Lee. There are probably some job opportunities up there in providing him with a Don Zimmer punching bag or some natural herbal garnish to sprinkle on his pancakes.

Question of the day: Who can catch the knuckleball???

FWIW: Nice story in Sunday's projo about the excellent squad the Pawsox are putting together this year. Could be best lineup since days of Mo Vaughn and Phil Plantier and best pitching staff since Bruce Hurst era. Should be some great baseball at McCoy this summer.

Doff your caps for Kirby, hitting wall balls against the big baggie in the sky.

I agree, h.b., that the speaker of the poem has great affection for his neighbor and the annual ritual, but "Why do (good fences) make good neighbors? Isn't it where there are cows?" The overall message of the poem is exactly as you have used it here, in a way. That is to say that we as thinking people should not need walls to show us the boundaries of privacy.

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